The Fisheye

Part 4: How Technology Can Save the Oceans… with a little bit of help

August 8, 2016
Each year, fishermen around the world throw back more than seven million tons of unwanted sea life. This “bycatch” includes everything from whales and dolphins to turtles to too-small juvenile fish, and once they’re pulled up in a net, many are injured or die before they can be released. This is the collateral damage of the fishing industry.

Part 3: How Technology Can Save the Oceans… with a little bit of help

July 27, 2016
We know them from grocery store checkouts—barcodes and QR codes are ubiquitous on retail shelves. What if that same technology could help us trace our fish? From seafood suppliers and producers to retailers and chefs, the power of technology to promote traceability and storytelling is catching on.

Part 2: How Technology Can Save the Oceans… with a little bit of help

July 13, 2016
In part 2 of our 4-part series on how technology can help save the seas (with a little help), we turn our attention to innovations in regulation and enforcement. It might not sound exciting, but these companies are using satellites, aerial mapping, and drones to help fight overfishing and exploitation of the oceans.

How Technology Can Save the Oceans… with a little bit of help

July 1, 2016
Snapchat, instagram, remote-controlled drones. Technology is speeding along faster than we can install the latest iPhone update. And with so much time, energy, and money pouring into tech, we’re excited to see new innovations that can help our oceans as well.

Catching Up With… Crystal Sanders

June 20, 2016
How a lifelong love of fishing became a mission to save the ocean by eating its inhabitants. On a recent Thursday night in San Francisco, a group of guests gathered at Fine & Rare for a dinner to celebrate “little” fish. This Seafood Stories dinner featured chef Douglas Bernstein, executive chef at Sausalito, California’s Fish, a restaurant dedicated to sustainable seafood and storytelling. Over Fort Bragg Sea Urchin, San Francisco Bay Anchovies, and Oregon Butter Clam Ceviche, guests learned the importance of eating lower on the food chain by enjoying the smaller fish.

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